Coronavirus (COVID-19) guidelines and resources for HIV and sexual health sector

Coronavirus (COVID-19) has created the biggest public health challenge in living memory. As the NHS continues to respond to the pandemic, the HIV and sexual health sector has adapted quickly to continue to support the populations it serves.

Our health systems and services delivered by the Voluntary, Community and Social Enterprise (VCSE) sector are finding new ways to deliver care and support by telephone, online and via their communication channels.

The following information provides sector guidelines for people working in HIV and sexual health, including resources for communities in response to the challenges coronavirus have presented.

Guidelines for health and sector professionals

British HIV Association (BHIVA)

British Association for Sexual Health and HIV (BASHH)

Faculty of Sexual and Reproductive Healthcare (FRSH)

FRSH, BASHH and BHIVA

Community resources and information

Terrence Higgins Trust

NAT (National AIDS Trust)

i-base

Joint Council for the Welfare of Immigrants (JCWI), Migrants Organise, and Medact

  • Covid-19 Mutual Aid UK: Guide for Supporting Migrants During Coronavirus (via Google docs. Not HIV specific, for organisations working with migrants)

Correlation Network, Europe

International

World Health Organisation (WHO)

UNAIDS

As new information arises we will update accordingly.

Introducing the HIV Prevention England Faith Engagement Strategy

Despite the excellent headway the UK has made to reduce new HIV transmissions, stigma is prevalent and may curtail our ambitions for ending new HIV transmissions by 2030.

  • Stigma is a barrier to people testing and accessing biomedical interventions such as pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP).
  • Stigma affects the wellbeing, health and overall quality of life of people living with HIV.

We have produced a national faith engagement strategy which aims to increase the involvement of faith leaders and communities in challenging HIV-related stigma, supporting the uptake of HIV testing and prevention, and promoting the good health and wellbeing of people living with HIV.

Faith leaders are well-respected role models in their communities; they have the ability to reach people who do not necessarily access health services, and they have a role in supporting efforts to end discrimination against marginalised people.

HIV Prevention England (HPE) will provide opportunities to support faith leaders and communities, including through National HIV Testing Week, providing free resources, information briefings, and sector training events.

Download the strategy document

HIV Prevention England Faith Engagement Strategy [PDF]

Get involved

HPE provides resources and training. If you are a faith leader or work with faith communities:

  • Take advantage of our free resources.
  • Sign-up to our monthly newsletter to keep up-to-date with our latest news and events (complete the form opposite or below).

Forthcoming events

National HIV Testing Week starts Saturday 16 November 2019.

This year, World AIDS Day is on Sunday 1 December 2019.

New resources portal

It Starts With Me - New HPE Portal

Ahead of our summer campaign, HPE has launched a new resources portal featuring an easy-to-use interface for ordering campaign materials and merchandise.

Award-winning HIV prevention leaflets, posters and other promotional materials are available to all organisations in England engaged in HIV prevention. These include GP surgeries, clinics, statutory services, colleges, universities, and community organisations.

Register your new account and order your free HIV prevention resources today.

PHE resources to support Sexual Health evaluation

Public Health England talk us through their latest resources to support evaluation in Sexual Health, Reproductive Health and HIV.

Have you ever wondered if what you’re doing in your service actually achieves what you set out to do? How do you know? For example:

We’ve introduced HIV home sampling, what impact has it had?

We need to reduce our late HIV diagnoses, what can we do and how do we know we’ve achieved it?

Public Health England (PHE) is often asked about what works and what is the ‘best way’ to achieve a desired outcome in the area of sexual health, reproductive health and HIV (SH, RH and HIV). In order to understand what innovations work well there is a need to evaluate interventions and projects. Evaluation is essential to identify successful innovations which should be promoted and, equally important, those that are less successful or could be improved before being implemented elsewhere.

A vast amount of literature and tools to guide evaluation exist. However, no support tools or repository exist specifically for SH, RH and HIV. PHE therefore developed the following resources specifically aimed at supporting evaluations in this sector:

  1. Introductory guide to evaluating interventions
  2. Evaluation workbook
  3. Menu of output/outcome measures in SH, RH and HIV

The introductionary guide explains what evaluation is, why you should evaluate, and the different types of evaluations you can choose from. The guide explains how to undertake an evaluation using the concepts of ‘theory of change’ and a ‘logic model’:

The theory of change defines the long term goals of your intervention, and then maps backwards to identify necessary preconditions, i.e. the shorter terms and intermediate steps leading to the long term outcomes.

A logic model is a diagrammatic representation of your theory of change. It identifies the inputs, activities, outputs and outcomes, all part of the overall evaluation of your intervention. The guide contains illustrative examples, for example a logic model of a condom distribution scheme.

The evaluation workbook is a pragmatic and easy to follow tool consisting of 16 questions about your intervention or project. The answers you provide to these questions lead to the second part of this workbook: the development of a logic model.

This identifies the inputs (resources or materials needed to deliver your intervention), the activities (the interventions provided by the service or programme), the outputs (amount of activity provided) and the outcomes (factors which are expected to change as a result of the activities). The final part of the workbook contains a suggested template to write up the findings of your evaluation.

The third part of the resources provides an overview of the current standards and quality measures in SH, RH and HIV. It includes for example quality standards (July 2018) from BHIVA, NICE, and BASHH, among others. These standards can assist you to choose indicators to help measure the impact of your intervention or project.

PHE has also published resources for the evaluation of general health and wellbeing projects and programmes, helping professionals increase their knowledge, understanding and capabilities in evaluating health and wellbeing projects.

These resources consist of a general overview, guidance summaries (collation of 48 guides and frameworks on evaluation of different topics), and useful training resources including video clips on different types of evaluations, logic models, intervention mapping and case studies.