PHE resources to support Sexual Health evaluation

Public Health England talk us through their latest resources to support evaluation in Sexual Health, Reproductive Health and HIV.

Have you ever wondered if what you’re doing in your service actually achieves what you set out to do? How do you know? For example:

We’ve introduced HIV home sampling, what impact has it had?

We need to reduce our late HIV diagnoses, what can we do and how do we know we’ve achieved it?

Public Health England (PHE) is often asked about what works and what is the ‘best way’ to achieve a desired outcome in the area of sexual health, reproductive health and HIV (SH, RH and HIV). In order to understand what innovations work well there is a need to evaluate interventions and projects. Evaluation is essential to identify successful innovations which should be promoted and, equally important, those that are less successful or could be improved before being implemented elsewhere.

A vast amount of literature and tools to guide evaluation exist. However, no support tools or repository exist specifically for SH, RH and HIV. PHE therefore developed the following resources specifically aimed at supporting evaluations in this sector:

  1. Introductory guide to evaluating interventions
  2. Evaluation workbook
  3. Menu of output/outcome measures in SH, RH and HIV

The introductionary guide explains what evaluation is, why you should evaluate, and the different types of evaluations you can choose from. The guide explains how to undertake an evaluation using the concepts of ‘theory of change’ and a ‘logic model’:

The theory of change defines the long term goals of your intervention, and then maps backwards to identify necessary preconditions, i.e. the shorter terms and intermediate steps leading to the long term outcomes.

A logic model is a diagrammatic representation of your theory of change. It identifies the inputs, activities, outputs and outcomes, all part of the overall evaluation of your intervention. The guide contains illustrative examples, for example a logic model of a condom distribution scheme.

The evaluation workbook is a pragmatic and easy to follow tool consisting of 16 questions about your intervention or project. The answers you provide to these questions lead to the second part of this workbook: the development of a logic model.

This identifies the inputs (resources or materials needed to deliver your intervention), the activities (the interventions provided by the service or programme), the outputs (amount of activity provided) and the outcomes (factors which are expected to change as a result of the activities). The final part of the workbook contains a suggested template to write up the findings of your evaluation.

The third part of the resources provides an overview of the current standards and quality measures in SH, RH and HIV. It includes for example quality standards (July 2018) from BHIVA, NICE, and BASHH, among others. These standards can assist you to choose indicators to help measure the impact of your intervention or project.

PHE has also published resources for the evaluation of general health and wellbeing projects and programmes, helping professionals increase their knowledge, understanding and capabilities in evaluating health and wellbeing projects.

These resources consist of a general overview, guidance summaries (collation of 48 guides and frameworks on evaluation of different topics), and useful training resources including video clips on different types of evaluations, logic models, intervention mapping and case studies.

Social media pack for summer campaign 2018

I'm Stopping HIV - Sadiq

We have created a social media pack to help you promote the HIV Prevention England summer campaign on your social media. The campaign launched on Monday 18 June 2018.

Theme

The campaign will be raising awareness and promoting actions of the various ways to prevent HIV such as condoms, testing, PrEP and treatment.

The tagline for the campaign is ‘I’m stopping HIV.’ and an explanation of which prevention tool used will follow. The people featured in the campaign images and videos are a mixture of people living with and without HIV.

Hashtag

This year’s summer campaign hashtag is #ImStoppingHIV.

Hashtags are not case sensitive so using #imstoppinghiv would work as well – we’ve just used capitals to make it easier to read what the hashtag is about.

What’s in the pack?

Images: a selection of images for use on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram or any another social network.

Links: to information on the various ways of preventing HIV. There are links to interactive tools that:

  • Recommend the best condom to use,
  • assess when someone should get tested,
  • help to choose a type of test based on preference and suitability,
  • help to find local testing services.

Suggested posts: examples of posts for Facebook and Instagram as well as tweets for Twitter.

Videos:
I’m stopping HIV
I’m stopping HIV – Summer

Downloads

What we are asking people to do?

Our summer campaign calls to action are:

Be educated: learn what the four different ways to prevent HIV are and why they are important.

Make changes: we want people to know how to reduce the risk of getting HIV by:

  • choosing the right fitting condom
  • finding out if they need to get tested for HIV, where to do it and the different ways they can via the tools on our website,
  • understanding what PrEP is, how it works and how to access it,
  • encouraging people living with HIV to access and adhere to treatment for health benefits for themselves and for the added advantage of not having to worry about passing it on to anyone else.

Pass it forward: share the information from the campaign messages with friends, family and on social media.

Social Media Pack – I Can’t Pass On HIV

We’ve created a social media pack to help you promote the spring campaign from HIV Prevention England.

The campaign will launch on Monday 16 April so we urge you not to start using the resources provided until then please.

Theme

The campaign will raise awareness that people living with HIV who are on treatment and have an undetectable viral load cannot pass on the virus to someone else sexually, even if condoms are not used during sex.

The tagline for the campaign is ‘I can’t pass on HIV’. All of the people featured in the campaign images and videos are living with HIV.

For more information on the campaign please see our campaign briefing [PDF].

What’s in the pack?

Images: A selection of images for use on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram or any other social media platform.

Suggested posts: Examples of posts for Facebook and Twitter.

Download pack (excluding videos)

Videos: We have four videos available to download separately.

Treatment infographic video – A short animated infographic video explaining the importance of treatment.

Tom’s Story – Tom has been living with HIV for over five years and explains how treatment has changed his life.

Mercy’s Story – Mercy talks about being undetectable and being able to have children while living with HIV.

George’s Story – George speaks about being undetectable and how that has changed his life for the better.

What are we asking people to do?

There are three things that we are encouraging people to do during thing campaign.

Spread the word: People can share information on the campaign messages.

Get tested: Find out if they need to get tested for HIV, where to get tested and the different ways of getting tested by using the tools on our website

Take medication: For people already diagnosed with HIV we are encouraging them to access treatment. This benefits their own health and has the added advantage of not having to worry about passing HIV on to anyone else.

Trans-inclusive National HIV Testing Week webinar

This year we are putting a spotlight on increasing testing among trans people as part of the National HIV Testing Week campaign.

This is particularly important because globally trans people experience higher rates of HIV prevalence, and are more vulnerable to getting HIV compared to other groups. General health services may not meet the needs of trans people due to lack of awareness of trans health issues or cultural insensitivities. There is also a scarcity of specialist services.

To support a trans-inclusive National HIV Testing Week, we will be hosting an informative webinar for health professionals who provide services for trans people and the general population.

The session will cover:

  • an overview of trans health and HIV issues
  • real-life experiences of trans people
  • clinical perspectives on providing trans-inclusive services
  • practical information on how to promote a trans-inclusive service
  • tools, further information and referral options.

It will be held on Tuesday 7 November from 12.00pm to 1.30pm.

This session will be delivered in partnership with CliniQ, ClinicT, The LGBT Foundation and Yorkshire Mesmac. Special thanks to CliniQ for driving this initiative.

Register now

Presentations from the 2017 National HIV Prevention England Conference

On 18 May 2017 HIV Prevention England (HPE) hosted its biennial national HIV prevention conference in London.

More than 300 professionals were in attendance from all over England and beyond. To date, there have been over 200 views of the event livestream.

If you missed the event or specific workshops, please see all the available presentations on our events page. If you have any questions regarding individual presentations, email us and we will get back to you.

Plenary Sessions

Workshops

  • Combination Prevention [Video]
  • HIV Prevention Innovation Fund: Project Showcase
  • Prevention for Gay and Bisexual Men
  • HIV Testing in Community Settings
  • PrEP: From Trial to Reality [Video]
  • Home Sampling and Self Testing
  • Engaging African Communities
  • Systems Approaches to Testing and Prevention